Category: HR

Businessary bolsters team with top talent acquisition and employer branding leader

Melbourne, Australia: Businessary is pleased to announce recruitment and employer branding leader Jason Burns has joined the team as the Head of Talent Acquisition & Employer Branding.

After nearly four years since inception, Businessary has well and truly established itself as a preferred provider of business advisory, marketing and HR services. With more than ten years of talent acquisition experience gained both locally and overseas, Burns’ appointment bolsters Businessary’s capability in the HR advisory space.

“Attracting top talent through a strong EVP and getting it right when it comes to recruitment strategy and process is a frequent pain point for business leaders. Being able to offer our clients these services backed by someone of Jason’s calibre is a huge coup for our business,” said Businessary Managing Director Annabel Rees.

Previously, Burns headed up Talent Acquisition for REA Group, and was the Head of Recruitment for Gallagher Australia. Most recently, he’s been providing ad hoc consulting services to a select group of businesses. Renowned for his ability to understand different industries and businesses and translate that into a compelling offer for candidates, Burns is passionate about ‘making great companies ace at talent acquisition.’

“I’ve worked with Annabel and the team in previous roles and I know the exceptional level of services they provide and quality of clients that the business attracts. I’ve got a reinvigorated energy and empathy for the challenges that come with building an employee brand and internal recruitment and joining Businessary gives me the opportunity to apply my skills and expertise,” emphasised Burns.

“The competition for talent is cutthroat, and if you’re not being proactive in this space you’re going to miss out on some great candidates.”

For all media enquiries please contact:

Melissa Montang, Head of Marketing and Communications at Businessary
+61 431 251 339
[email protected]

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About Businessary

After holding numerous high level corporate roles and successfully transforming the performance of many organisations, Businessary Founder, Managing Director and CEO Annabel Rees recognised that she could make a real difference by providing business expertise previously only available to large businesses to small and medium businesses.

Employing all the diverse knowledge, experience and expertise gathered over many years consulting and leading businesses in the corporate realm, the team at Businessary provides a range of business advisory solutions to help organisations find a clear path to business success.  A trusted advisor that supports businesses to meet their business challenges to optimise business performance.

Our expertise lies in:

Businessary solutions range from online toolkits through to bespoke consulting solutions.

Maternity Leave – Burden or Mutual Benefit?

The most common types of questions we get on the topic of maternity/parental leave are around whether an employee can be made redundant whilst on maternity leave, and what the employer’s rights are when it comes to an employee returning from maternity leave and requesting flexibility to their working arrangements.

If we dig a little deeper into the underlying concerns managers have when they want to explore these questions, it is often the unknown as to the productivity and commitment of the employee upon their return.

Promoting flexibility and supporting parents back into the workplace isn’t just your responsibility and obligation, it’s an important part of your people management strategy. Done well, it can also be an opportunity to truly demonstrate your integrity in the modern workplace and can be a real point of difference for companies who get it right.

The challenge for managers when faced with a returning employee or request to change previous arrangements is to think bigger picture and flexibly themselves, as it is often a case in which actions speak louder than words and they start to question if the role is really needed.

So, what are the facts when it comes to parental leave and flexibility?

With regards to what an employer is permitted to do within legislation, an employer can make an employee on parental leave redundant if the redundancy is genuine and the correct process is followed.  Furthermore, there is no requirement for an employer to agree to a request for flexible working arrangements, therefore, an employer can also refuse a flexible working request provided the refusal is based on reasonable business ground.

Businessary HR Manager Lauren McCleery comments “While the legislation allows for redundancies of employees on parental leave, I’ve found that in most cases when talking through the situation and the business needs with the manager, a redundancy and refusal of flexible working would not be genuine, and in some cases fabricated – leaving the business open to risk.”

Are you missing an opportunity? Viewing parental leave as an HR tool

Returning parents to the workforce and allowing increased flexibility can be an opportunity for employers.  Employees returning are often more motivated, productive and better able to juggle demands because they are very conscious of time restraints and being as efficient as possible.  This is something that can be utilised and fostered by managers and will ensure greater engagement, loyalty and performance for the business! It also helps ensure that you don’t lose the investment you’ve made in that employee, and the valuable intellectual property they’ve developed within their role. It can cost 1.5 – 2.5 times an employee’s salary to replace them if they leave because of the money spent on recruitment, retraining and inducting people into your business. And in specialist roles, where skills are hard to find, these costs are significantly higher.

Parental leave and flexibility makes business sense (and cents)

A study done by the Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI) found that paid parental leave schemes give medium to large employers an advantage and can actually help cut costs and deliver a better result to your bottom line. This may be due to reduced turnover/recruitment costs,.

On the flip side, employees that are not supported, refused flexibility and potentially terminated upon return not only send a person back out into the job market with a negative experience of the business, but also sends a negative message throughout the business for employees that remain, that may potentially be in that exact situation in the future.

Taking it up a level – prepare for the future workforce

Embracing parental leave, carer’s leave and flexibility arrangements can be more than an engagement and retention tool. It can also help to attract the best available talent and work to normalise caregiving – making it okay for single people, men, senior executives, anyone really, to take a block of time off or make flexible arrangements to care for an ailing family member or new child. Some countries and companies have begun to mandate parental leave for both men and women, which helps level the playing field for men and women at both home and work.

In a recent Forbes article, author Shelley Zalis noted ‘It’s unfortunate because we’re losing our best leaders to caregiving, yet caregiving qualities make the best leaders today.’

Do you want to talk to an HR Manager about your specific business situation? Get 30 Min Free HR Advice by calling (03) 9662 9900.

Another win for equality!

The Fair Work Ombudsman recently announced its successful litigation against an employer for racial discrimination against employees.

The employer had been treating two Malaysian employees differently to Australian staff in the form of underpayment of wages, as well as requiring them to perform additional work hours but failing to record them. This different treatment had resulted in over $28,000 in underpayment of wages.

This was the first time Fair Work had taken legal action against an employer for racial discrimination against employees, and the successful litigation saw both the company and the owner operator receive penalties totalling more than $200,000.

This was an important win for equality for employees. There has been significant focus over previous years on ensuring that employees are receiving minimum entitlements from employees, however this win will highlight the importance of ensuring minimum provisions are provided, and for employers to be aware that they are held accountable for treating all workers fairly!

Concerned your business may have workplace discrimination and unconscious bias?  Give us a call on (03) 9662 9900to discuss and get you back on the right track!

New financial year – new minimum wage

It’s that time of year again! Fair Work has announced a 3.5% increase to the minimum wage.

That means that come 1 July 2018, all Modern Award minimum base rates of pay will increase by 3.5%, and the national minimum wage will increase to $719.20 per week.

The Fair Work Ombudsman office is currently working to update all the online pay guides for each Award which will be available in due time.   However, now is the time to prepare your business for pay changes to be processed in the first full pay cycle in the new financial year.

Not sure where to start? Need help interpreting an Award or your employees pay rates?  Contact us!

Long Service Leave Act Changes Have Been Made 15th May

Victoria: Exciting new Long Service Leave changes for parents taking parental leave and employees reaching 7 years of continuous employment! 

New changes just passed on 15 May 2018 in the Upper House of the Victorian Parliament mean that employees will have greater flexibility and access to Long Service Leave (LSL) sooner under the new legislation.

Changes include:

  • Employees will be allowed to take Long Service Leave (LSL) after 7 years of continuous employment (pro rata) instead of 10 years;
  • Parents taking up to 52 weeks of unpaid parental leave will have their leave included when calculating continuous employment for LSL accrual;
  • And employees will have more flexibility in how they can take their long service leave.

Employers need to ensure that you review and update relevant policies and practices so that you’re correctly accruing and administrating long service leave.

Changes come into effect on 1 November 2018, unless proclaimed earlier, so now is the time to prepare!

Give us a call on 03 9662 9900 if you would like to discuss how these changes affect your business and how to prepare. Remember we also offer up to 30 minutes of FREE HR advice on your first call!  Speak to an HR Consultant today

Talk To An HR Manager Today

What does a great induction look like?

Recruiting is important, and so is managing performance – but don’t underestimate the importance of induction in the employee lifecycle!

Your new starters have already formed a view of your business through the application and interview process – do you think it’s a good one? Yes or no, the induction process is your chance to either turn a mediocre perception into a good one or turn a good one into a great one!

What is an employee induction?

An employee induction programme is the consistent process your business should use to welcome your new employees to the company and prepare them for their new role. Sometimes an induction is also known as ‘onboarding’, ‘orientation’ or ‘socialising’.

The process is designed to help integrate your new team member into the organisation. You’re forming the bond between your company and your employee that can withstand the normal ups and downs of a role.

A great start – what happens in an induction?

Induction can be quite formal and lengthy or informal and brief, just covering the necessities. It should mirror the culture of your organisation.

Here are the main sections that should be covered off in your induction:

  • First day logistics – i.e. what time should they arrive, who to ask for, who is organising keys/badge/uniform
  • Legal obligations – i.e. signed copy of the letter of engagement or employment contract, completed tax file number declaration form (unless declined by employee), completed superannuation choice form, etc
  • Introductions and safety – introduce your new employee to their team and schedule meetings with key contacts, show them the facilities and emergency exits
  • Culture and ‘the way we do things here’ – share the story of your business and expected values and behaviours

A great induction can help you turn your employees into your biggest advocates. This will help you improve not just your company’s employee attraction and retention, but also your client attraction and retention as well! This is the lens through which you should view your induction programme. Word of mouth can be either the best or the worst marketing for your employer brand.

Special offer: FREE employee induction checklist!

Using an new employee induction checklist is best practice to make sure you have covered all the requirements.

Simply fill in your name and valid email and we will send you your FREE employee induction checklist.

 

How do you ensure a good induction?

It’s all in the details. There are a lot of moving pieces to having someone join the organisation. Has all the appropriate paperwork been filled out? Have you ordered all the hardware and software they need, as well as setting up their desk? Having access to the network and emails is important, but so is having pens and paper to take notes during their early days.

A nice touch? Have their business cards ready and waiting on their desk when your new starter walks in.

Administrative tasks are important in induction, but so is ‘cultural induction’. Where do people go for lunch? Who can your new starter join for lunch on their first day, have you scheduled a team lunch or morning tea to properly welcome the new team member?

Does your business have a more formal culture, or relaxed? Do you have casual Friday attire? It’s a bit awkward to show up on your first Friday in your best suit when everyone else is wearing jeans (or vice versa if someone assumes you have casual Friday and you don’t!)

These are all one-percenters for sure, and if you miss one or two it isn’t likely to be a dealbreaker. But you can imagine the difference to your employee if they show up and nothing has been prepared for them, versus arriving to work their first day, confident that due thought and effort has been put into their arrival.

Interested to learn more? You can also check out our blog on getting both induction and leaving right in your business.

Need help with your induction programme or have other HR queries?

Need some additional HR Services Melbourne advice then you can Get 30 min FREE advice from an HR Manager first! Call today on (03) 9662 9900.

The information provided in this article is only general in nature – before making business decisions you should consider seeking advice specific to your situation.

Is redundancy the new performance management?

Too often we hear from an employer or manager when they’ve reached their limit with a poor performer. Our initial advice is often to begin a performance management process, but often we’re met with resistance because the problem has gotten out of hand and the employer now feels like they don’t have the time nor wherewithal to begin to manage the employee’s performance. Often, they turn the conversation to whether or not they can use redundancy as an alternative option. Is that a viable option? Let’s explore it.

What’s the difference between performance management and redundancy?

A performance process involves addressing the performance or behavioural concerns of an employee, and is focused on improvement.  This process can often involve first and final written warnings, and potentially termination of employment as a final outcome, or an immediate outcome depending on the seriousness of the issue.

In between those steps should be periods of review and assessment, during which you should provide your employee with the relevant support to assist sustained improvement.. It’s essential that a proper process is followed throughout the performance management process to ensure that all reasonable steps have been taken and documented in accordance with legislation.

Active performance management can help you create a strong culture of excellence for your business. It creates clear expectations and can help attract and retain highly motivated and productive team members.

If you’re trying to leverage redundancy in place of performance management, it could be illegal and have unintended consequences, like a post-redundancy hit to your team’s morale and an impact to their productivity, not to mention unfair dismissal risks.

“A classic mistake that employers often make is that they don’t realise that if they make a role or person redundant, they are claiming that the position is genuinely not required by the business, therefore potentially leaving the business under resourced and open to the risks of an non genuine redundancy process,” notes Businessary HR Manager Lauren McCleery.

“A redundancy means the employer no longer wants or needs to have that position performed by anyone. And if it’s not a genuine redundancy, for example if you then try to recruit to replace the role you’ve made redundant, the employee could claim that it’s an unfair dismissal and make a claim against the company to the Fair Work Ombudsman.

“Generally we would advise clients to focus on leading by example – providing coaching, mentoring and support to their teams, including a well structured performance management program. This will help mitigate the need for a knee jerk reaction of using redundancies to exit an underperforming or unliked employee from the business.

“Your managers and leaders should have the capability and confidence to handle difficult conversations, and if you’re not finding that they are able to, then perhaps it’s at their level that more training and effort should be applied.”

But businesses can and do have the need to make roles redundant at times. Your business could consider making roles redundant for a number of reasons, including new technology that reduces reliance on the role, economic slowdown or business slowdown, closing or relocating an office, or perhaps you’re undergoing a merger or restructure.

If you’re not making a role redundant for genuine business reasons, you could be trying to cut corners. However, if your reasons are valid, making a role or roles redundant could be the answer for your business.

How do I make someone redundant?

Firstly, make sure that you are looking at a ‘genuine redundancy’, which requires you as the employer to meet three requirements, according to Fair Work:

  • You do not still need the employee’s job to be done by someone (i.e. you’re not hiring someone else to do the same role)
  • You’ve followed relevant requirements to consult with your employees about the redundancy under an award or registered agreement
  • You’ve made a reasonable attempts to find suitable alternative roles for the employee within the organisation.

You then have an obligatory consultation process to set out what you as the employer need to do, and this process should be done ASAP after you’ve made the decision to make major changes to the workplace that will result in redundancy.

Your consultation requirements include:

  • Notifying your employees that may be affected by the changes
  • Provide them with information about the changes and the anticipated effects
  • Discuss steps that you’ve taken to avoid or minimise negative impacts on your employees
  • Consider your employees’ ideas or suggestions about the changes
  • Discuss any potential suitable alternative roles available.

Making the redundancy process as smooth as possible

Strong and consistent communication is key. You should carefully plan and implement a communication strategy to avoid mixed messages or inaccurate information throughout your obligatory consultation process.

“If you’re not sure about your obligations, this is when you need to rely on your HR team or find an HR consultant,” adds McCleery. “This isn’t the time to wing it or leave it to chance.”

Provide dignity, support and respect throughout the process

The number one skill that will be useful to achieving an outcome with dignity and respect is empathy – how would you want to be treated if you were in your employee’s shoes?

Often best practice involves asking your impacted employees their input regarding any measures that might mitigate against the impact of redundancy, such as redeployment opportunities.

If the result is indeed that the employee’s employment will terminate due to redundancy, there are a number of support options that you could consider making available, such as offering a reference or giving your employee access to career management support such as outplacement services, financial advice or legal advice.  It’s also important to consider providing your employees with access to counselling and health/mental health support through a confidential service like an Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Your managers and leaders will have the most regular contact with the impacted employees during a redundancy process, so it’s vital that they’re well positioned and armed with the correct information and messages to make themselves available to answer questions and discuss the change process with employees as the need arises.

To summarise

  • You need to make sure that any redundancies you’re considering meet the criteria set out by Fair Work.
  • You can make roles redundant when it’s a genuine redundancy, which can be tricky so we encourage you to get expert advice.
  • Redundancy isn’t a good replacement for performance management – you can’t use it to terminate someone who is underperforming or a ‘bad cultural fit.’
  • Focus on your performance management process NOW so you don’t run into a scenario of wanting to exit someone from your business without the structure, process, time or energy to do so.

Need to have a difficult conversation with an employee?

Get 30 min free advice from an HR Manager first! Call today on (03) 9662 9900.

The information provided in this article is only general in nature – before making business decisions you should consider seeking advice specific to your situation.

Join us for game changing HRIS launch event! | Businessary & Microimage HCM Cloud

Microimage Australia and Businessary have formed a strategic partnership to roll out a game changer in cloud enabled human capital management solutions.

When: Tuesday, 24 October – Starts at 4.30pm – Demo at 5.15pm SHARP
Where: Royal Melbourne Hotel, 649 Bourke St Melbourne

Find out more here.

RSVP to [email protected]om.au 

Who is Microimage HCM Cloud?

Microimage HCM Cloud powers SME organisations towards digital transformation of their Human Capital Management. Built on the Microsoft Azure Cloud platform the system encompasses core HR functionality through to integrated talent management, succession planning, robust real time analytics that includes BOTS, AI and native mobile apps.

www.microimagehcm.cloud

Media release: Microimage HCM Cloud and Businessary partner up to offer game changing cloud-based HR management system

Melbourne: Microimage Australia and Businessary have formed a strategic partnership to roll out a game changer in cloud enabled human capital management solutions.

Microimage Australia Pty Ltd, the Australian arm of the Microimage group (a well-established human capital management (HCM) solution provider in South East Asia) has formed a strategic alliance with Businessary Pty Ltd, a specialist in providing business and human resource professional services to Australian and New Zealand businesses.

Bringing fresh HR technology to progressive Australian/NZ businesses

Together, Microimage and Businessary will introduce a fresh perspective to human capital management to the Australian and New Zealand market, Peter Wijeyaratne, Director Microimage Australia, highlights.

“Workplace dynamics, culture and processes have changed dramatically over the past few years and with the new millennial mindset, and the digital savvy workforce now a dominant part of the employee mix, we are confident that our combined expertise in software and Businessary professional services will be a game changer in the Australian market,” said Peter.

“The Microimage HCM Cloud is a digital HR solution that covers all areas of HR including performance management, recruitment, talent acquisition, learning management, succession planning, employee engagement, time and attendance, analytics and native mobile apps. Our solution is a cloud based solution that is built for the Microsoft Azure platform and makes full use of the Microsoft Azure Cloud including all the security and technical features of the platform. This is a global Microsoft co-sell ready solution embracing all of the Azure benefits.

The Businessary difference

Businessary Managing Director, Annabel Rees sees this partnership as a refreshing and welcome opportunity for organisations of all sizes to make use of the modular nature and scalability of the application itself.

“Our purpose is to help businesses find a clear path to optimal business performance. Businessary has a depth of knowledge and resources in contemporary HR practices which we provide our clients, and we can see a fantastic synergy in coupling our experience with the Microimage solution to offer our clients and other organisations an HR system solution that is user friendly, intuitive, and easily customised.

“Our smaller clients will benefit from accessing a preconfigured HRM solution previously unobtainable due to pricing and customisation costs.  Businessary’s point of difference is driven from our multidisciplinary team using tight project management discipline, combined with our tech savvy HR and change professionals – a unique combination to take care of the all the account management, change management, customisation, documentation and training that results in a rapid deployment and seamless implementation. From our initial conversation with interested organisations, it’s clear that this is a compelling offer that will give our clients a competitive advantage.”

The Businessary and Microimage preferred partnership extends to Australia and New Zealand.

-ends-

For media enquiries, a demo or more information, please contact:

Annabel Rees | +61 407 562 244 | annabel.rees@businessary.com.au

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About Businessary

Businessary logo

After holding numerous high level corporate roles and successfully transforming the performance of many organisations, Businessary Founder and Managing Director Annabel Rees recognised that she could make a real difference by providing business expertise previously only available to large businesses to small and medium businesses.

Employing all the diverse knowledge, experience and expertise gathered over many years consulting and leading businesses in the corporate realm, the team at Businessary provides a range of business advisory solutions to help organisations find a clear path to business success. 

A trusted advisor that supports businesses to meet their business challenges and optimise business performance.

Our expertise lies in:

  • Business advisory
  • Digital marketing solutions
  • HR and people solutions

 www.businessary.com.au 

 

About Microimage

Founded in 1995, Microimage HCM Cloud Powers Digital HR enables organisations to digitally transform human capital management and shift to a complete digital HCM platform, with seamless scaling across functionalities. The all new Microimage HCM Cloud offers a comprehensive platform from core HR to talent management. HCM Cloud is designed to run on Microsoft Azure Cloud.

Microimage HCM products are used by a diverse client base across the Middle East to East Asia at present. HCM Cloud is our latest digital HR solution designed to transform human resources management with digital capabilities including cloud, mobile, social and analytics.

At Microimage, our vision is, “To be a leading technology innovator for people driven businesses.” Our mission is “To continuously innovate to deliver advanced HCM technology for people driven businesses.”

Microimage HCM was identified among the preferred HCM Solution vendors in the “Gartner Market Guide for HCM Suite Applications” in 2016. We maintain high standards in product quality assurance, professional services and post implementation support. Microimage also works closely with Microsoft Corp, by developing products on Microsoft Azure Cloud infrastructure. Our product engineering team consists of software engineers who have contributed to some of the award-winning products in the past.

With over two decades of domain experience in human resources, working closely with HR consultants and related domain experts, company continues to incorporate best HR practices with latest innovative technologies.

www.microimagehcm.cloud

Are you aware of the latest penalties from Fair Work effective July 1?

Did you know new penalties have kicked in for business record keeping requirements?

We all know that good business records help you manage your business, make sound business decisions and in most cases can also improve the value of your business if you decide to sell it, but did you know that as a business you have legal obligations to store records and have them available for up to five to seven years depending on the “type” of records?

If you employ people under a modern award or agreement, you are legally required to keep accurate and complete time, hours, wages, leave, termination and issue pay slips to each employee. You need to keep each employees’ time and wages records for at least seven years and make sure they are always accessible for inspection.

Employees must also be given a copy of their employment records should they request it.
Whilst not all employee records are legally required to be kept, it may be best practice to keep certain employee records.

Penalty Rates

Record keeping obligations can vary from state to state and having a better understanding of your obligations can help prevent substantial penalty fees. From 1 July 2017 maximum penalties under the Fair Work Act are up to $63,000 per breach for a corporate entity and up to $12,600 for individuals who are involved in a breach.

Case Study: Penalties for breaching record keeping obligations

A recent federal court hearing fined two employers and their Director a whooping $37,500 for failing to keep proper employee records.

The Fair work Obudsman audited a popular Perth restaurant chain and found their lack of proper record keeping breached multiple legislative requirements.

Tram Hoang Han, who controlled the Han’s Café franchise was penalised $7500 and two companies of which she was the sole Director were penalised a further $15,000 each.

The Fair Work Ombudsman had previously advised Ms Han about the need to comply with minimum Award pay rates and keeping employee records.

The Fair Work Ombudsman’s audit was able to calculate that over 100 employees across four Han’s Café restaurants had been underpaid by $30,440. As a result of being short-changed their minimum hourly rate, Ms Han was made to back-pay these employees.

The audit also found that the practices for keeping time-and-wage records were so poor that they hindered the Fair Work Ombudsman from quantifying the full extent of the underpaid wages and entitlements, including penalty rates and overtime.

In his judgment, Justice Michael Barker described the record-keeping contraventions as “serious”. He said the “failure to maintain records truly strikes at the very foundation of the regulatory scheme which is designed to ensure that employees are paid their legal entitlements,” Justice Barker said.

So what next?

This is a timely reminder to employers to review their record keeping practices and take steps to rectify any non-compliance.

Seek the right HR advice and partner with Businessary to ensure you are keeping on track with your legislative obligations.

References:

Penalties for breach of record keeping

Case study